List of proposals for EuroDIG 2024

27-11-23 | 23:27
Access & literacy | Human rights & privacy | Media & content
One critical issue in European Internet governance is the digital divide, encompassing access and literacy gaps. Infrastructure disparities, especially between urban and rural areas, hinder equitable internet access. Affordability challenges further limit lower-income individuals, perpetuating social and economic inequalities. Access alone is insufficient; digital literacy skills are crucial. A skills divide, particularly affecting marginalized groups, contributes to the overall problem. Education disparities exacerbate the issue, impacting students' ability to engage in online learning. The relevance for Europe is multifaceted. Social inclusion is compromised as those without internet access and literacy face exclusion from essential services and democratic participation. Economic competitiveness is hindered, affecting global positioning and participation in the digital economy. Additionally, innovation and technology adoption are constrained by a significant digital divide, impacting Europe's ability to stay at the forefront of technological advancements. To address this, comprehensive strategies are needed. Improving infrastructure, ensuring affordable access, and promoting digital literacy initiatives are essential components. Bridging these gaps will not only contribute to a more inclusive and equitable society but will also enhance Europe's competitiveness in the digital age.
Submitted by
Meghna Jalan
Affiliation
Hertie School
Stakeholder
Academia

28-11-23 | 17:04
Access & literacy | Human rights & privacy | Innovation & economic issues
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Submitted by
Henar López
Affiliation
JEF ESPAÑA
Stakeholder
Other

30-11-23 | 13:02
Human rights & privacy | Media & content | Security & crime
"Navigating the Deepfake Landscape: Legal Regulations, Prevention Strategies, and AI Countermeasures against Information Attacks in Europe" Deepfakes pose a multifaceted threat to Europe, manipulating media content and risking authenticity. This disinformation method jeopardizes democratic processes, influencing elections and public opinion, undermining unity among EU states. Addressing this concern involves analyzing possible legal regulations to define deepfakes, establishing accountability frameworks, and fostering international cooperation. Prevention strategies encompass technological solutions, media literacy promotion, and platform policy analysis. Harnessing AI is crucial for content detection, attribution, and automated fact-checking. This topic would encompass a comprehensive deepfake mitigation approach, considering legal, preventive, and technological dimensions.
Submitted by
Rokas Danilevicius
Affiliation
Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Lithuania
Stakeholder
Government

30-11-23 | 18:06
Development of IG ecosystem | Human rights & privacy | Security & crime
Artificial Intelligence (AI) & Emerging Technologies. In cases of sextortion and grooming of minors online, AI-powered tools can make this process easier for perpetrators by allowing them to monitor social media activity on a larger scale and identify potential targets based on specific keywords, interests, or behaviours. These tools can analyse vast amounts of data and quickly identify children who may be vulnerable to manipulation. Perpetrators can use chatbots to create a false sense of trust and intimacy with children. They can initiate conversations about topics that interest the child and pretend to share the same interests. As the chatbot learns more about the child, it can use that information to tailor its responses and gain the child's trust even further. The emergence of deepfakes has introduced new risks, with deep nudes becoming increasingly prevalent. These edited versions of ordinary photos or videos that depict individuals in the nude account for 96% of all deepfakes. Sadly, more and more young people are falling prey to this technology. Deep nudes are not only used by perpetrators of financial sextortion, but also to create pornographic videos. As the technology behind deepfakes becomes more advanced and accessible, soon anyone with a phone will be able to create deceptively realistic content. In fact, AI technology is currently the only way to reliably identify deepfakes. Therefore, it is crucial that people become more aware of the potential dangers and that the topic receives greater attention.
Submitted by
Sabrina Vorbau
Affiliation
European Schoolnet - Insafe network
Stakeholder
Civil society

30-11-23 | 19:28
Human rights & privacy | Security & crime | Technical & operational issues
Empowering Vulnerable Online Users. Online platforms have become essential, connecting us socially, providing information, and offering entertainment. However, they also expose vulnerable users, such as children from marginalized groups to harmful content and behavior. Reporting such incidents can be challenging due to various barriers. According to the EU Kids Online project, 42% of children have encountered harmful online content. Global Kids Online research in February 2021 concluded that offline vulnerability correlates with online vulnerability. Children at risk offline are more exposed to online risks, experience harm more frequently, and struggle to find support. Negative online content, cyber-hate, discrimination, and violent extremism are more prevalent among children with lower levels of happiness or life satisfaction, girls are more likely to be victims of online sexual solicitation, coercive sexting, and cyber-dating violence. Unfortunately, many incidents go unreported. Reporting harmful online behavior poses unique challenges for marginalized groups, children with disabilities, LGBTQ+ individuals, and immigrants, especially refugees. Discrimination and lack of support hinder their reporting efforts. Emerging tools and strategies offer promising solutions for empowering vulnerable online users to report harmful content. Some platforms have implemented "one-click" reporting features, simplifying the reporting process and others implement AI solutions.
Submitted by
Sofia Rasgado Monteiro
Affiliation
Departamento de Desenvolvimento e Inovação Coordenadora do Centro Internet Segura, Portuguese Safer Internet Centre Coordinator – Insafe network
Stakeholder
Government

06-12-23 | 21:06
Human rights & privacy | Innovation & economic issues | Security & crime
Access to Internet a fundamental human right The interconnectedness of the cyber space contributes to the persisting online vulnerabilities, requiring enhanced protection of the users’ digital human rights through inter alia compulsory implementation of web security safeguards to enforcing minimum security baseline standard for digital infrastructure to capacitating users. Moreover, cross region collaboration and hamornisation of the regulatory frameworks is crucial to curb the growing pandemic of cybercrime. Considering that the GDPR has become like a de facto standard, similarly, the 2024 EuroDIG can be used as a platform to raise awareness and promote the universality of the Budapest Convention on Cybercrime.
Submitted by
Lufuno T Tshikalange
Affiliation
Orizur Consulting Enterprise
Stakeholder
Private sector


Planning process: Call for issues